Afghan Stories: Waiting for Hope

Afghan Stories: Waiting for Hope

31. 1. 2018

For three months photographer Sandra Calligaro travelled across Afghanistan to meet beneficiaries of humanitarian assistance. Through exceptional pictures Sandra portraits rare testimonies of forgotten Afghans whose lives have stopped. They are waiting for a new future.

In addition, on Wednesday 14. 2. 2018, we will be screening a successful documentary movie My Afghanistan. Danish filmmaker with Afghani origins, Nagieb Khaja, has decided to capture the "real" Afghanistan through the smartphone cameras operated by regular Afghans. After the film, a short debate will follow with the coordinator of PIN Afghan programs, Jaroslav Petřík. Small refreshment will also be provided. 

(18:00 - 20:00, entrance is free)

Nearly 40 years of conflict have deeply affected Afghanistan. Despite the stabilization objectives of the country announced by the international community, the security situation continues to deteriorate. Afghan civilians have paid a heavy price, as have health structures and humanitarian aid workers. Successive waves of violence have resulted in large population displacements, both within Afghanistan and into neighbouring countries.

Exhibition

2nd – 28th of February, Café Langhans, Vodičkova 37, Prague. 

Screening of the film

Wednesday 14th February, 18:00 – 20:30, free entrance

On Wednesday 14. 2. 2018, we will be screening a successful documentary movie My Afghanistan. After the film, a short debate follow with the coordinator of PIN Afghan programs, Jaroslav Petřík.

My Afghanistan - Life in the Forbidden Zone

Nagieb Khaja / Denmark / 2012 / 88 min.

Nagieb Khaja, a Danish filmmaker with Afghan roots, decided to capture the “real” Afghanistan. At first glance it was a simple idea. Afghans – including farmers, construction workers, nurses and local elders – would shoot their view of their country on cellphone cameras. The raw, rough footage offers a surprisingly poetic and novel view of the forlorn country and its inhabitants. At the same time, it captures daily life and reveals the concerns and binds of tradition encountered by locals. Men are forbidden from filming their mothers or sisters, while women can only shoot their courtyards because they are not allowed out. Approaching gunfire sends cameramen scurrying for cover and fear intensifies when news spreads locally that a suicide attack is imminent.


Author: People in Need